Turf Tips

Use a rain gage to see how much water your lawn is getting in the spring.

3 Steps, Spring Lawn Care

Three steps to get your lawn ready for summer

3 Steps, Spring Lawn Care

Three steps to get your lawn ready for summer

The sun is starting to come out, everything is beginning to green up, and we’re starting to get those beautiful fleeting days of perfect weather -- in between the record-breaking blizzards of course! Spring is the perfect time to start waking up your lawn and giving it a little extra love before the heat of the summer kicks in.

Fertilize, Aerate and Water

By spending a little more energy on your lawn in the spring, you can set it up for success in the coming hot months of summer. Fertilizer, aerate and water are the three steps to preparing your lawn for the heat of summer.

Learn why Spring is a great time to sod with Missy.

Spring Sodding

Beat the summer heat, Spring is a great time install new sod lawns

Spring Sodding

Beat the summer heat, Spring is a great time install new sod lawns

Spring is a terrific time to sod! Beat the summer heat and install sod now when the temperatures are cooler. In spring, the root systems of Bluegrass and other cool-season grasses will come alive and will root quickly. The warm days and cool nights create a perfect environment for growing and knitting new sod together; ideal conditions for developing a root system before the summer heat hits. New sod uses less water this time of year. Irrigation cycles in spring will be shorter, and it will be easier to keep your new sod damp during its first critical two weeks.  During summer, watering becomes a critical issue as new sod can dry out quickly.

This video explains gray snow mold and how to deal with it in turf in the spring.

Gray Snow Mold

Warm snow cover promotes gray snow mold

Gray Snow Mold

Warm snow cover promotes gray snow mold

We are seeing gray snow mold now that the snow has melted from north-facing areas. These matted areas occur when your grass is covered with snow for prolonged periods and temperatures are slightly below freezing.

Freeze-thaw promotes snow mold

The freeze and thaw that takes place under the snow are what causes this disease to form in the spring. The damage caused by snow molds is seldom serious. Now that the snow is gone, the best thing to do is gently rake the matted turf allowing it to dry. Gray snow mold activity stops when the temperature exceeds 45° F or the surface dries. In a few weeks, your grass will be green and healthy.